Ursa Major and Ursa Minor

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Ursa Major and Ursa Minor [Lat.,=the great bear; the little bear], two conspicuous northern constellations. Known to many peoples from ancient times, these constellations have had various names; the configuration of the seven brightest stars has been called the Bear, Septentriones (the seven plowing oxen), the Plow, Charles's Wain, and the Wagon. Ursa Minor was once known as Cynosura (from the Greek for “dog's tail”). In the United States part of Ursa Major is called the Big Dipper (or the Drinking Gourd) and part of Ursa Minor, the Little Dipper. Four of the seven bright stars in the Big Dipper form the bowl and three the handle; five of these stars are of second magnitude. The middle star in the handle of the Big Dipper is Mizar (Zeta Ursae Majoris). A fainter star, Alcor, which appears to be near Mizar, was observed from ancient times. These two stars are sometimes called a double star, but since they do not revolve around a common center of gravity they are not true doubles. Mizar itself is, however, a visual binary star and was the first to be recognized as such—by G. B. Riccioli in 1650. It was also the first spectroscopic binary to be discovered; this observation resulted from studies of the spectrum of the brighter component of Mizar, which revealed it as a binary consisting of a pair of stars of almost equal brightness. The two end stars in the bowl of the Big Dipper are known as the Pointers. A line extending through them to about five times the distance between them leads to the polestar (Polaris, or the North Star). Polaris is at the extreme end of the Little Dipper. Including Polaris there are three stars in the handle of the Little Dipper and four forming the bowl. The handles of the two Dippers extend in opposite directions, and when one bowl is upright the other is inverted. Ursa Major reaches its highest point in the evening sky in April and Ursa Minor its highest point in June. However, for observers in the middle and northern latitudes of the Northern Hemisphere both constellations are circumpolar and thus are visible throughout the year
Ursa Major Coordinates:
RA : 11:00
Declination : +58
Ursa Minor Coordinates;
RA : 15:40
Declination : +78

Pisces Constellations

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Pisces (Lat.,=the fishes), constellation lying directly S of Andromeda and on the ecliptic (the sun's apparent path through the heavens) between Aries and Aquarius; it is one of the constellations of the zodiac. Pisces is traditionally depicted as two fishes. Because of the precession of the equinoxes, the vernal equinox has moved westward from the constellation Aries (where it was located c.2,000 years ago) into Pisces. There are no exceptionally bright stars in Pisces, but a nova was observed there in 1925. Pisces reaches its highest point in the evening sky in November.Coordinates:RA : 00:20Declination : +10

Virgo Constellation

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Virgo (Lat.,=the virgin), constellation lying on the ecliptic (the sun's apparent path through the heavens) between Libra and Leo, and SW of Bo├Âtes; it is one of the constellations of the zodiac. Virgo is traditionally depicted as a maiden holding an ear of grain to symbolize the harvest; various civilizations identified her with such figures as Ceres, Isis, Ishtar, and Rhea. The most prominent star is Spica (Alpha Virginis), a white star of first magnitude. In 1936 a supernova was discovered in Virgo. A famous cluster of 2,500 galaxies, the Virgo cluster, lies in the constellation; the radio galaxy Virgo A is also found there. Virgo reaches its highest point in the evening sky in late May.Coordinates :RA : 13:20Declination: -02

Aquila Constellation

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Aquila [Lat.,=the eagle], equatorial constellation located N of Sagittarius and Capricornus, lying partly in the Milky Way. It is sometimes depicted as an eagle. It contains the bright star Altair (Alpha Aquilae) and the pulsating variable star Eta Aquilae. The brightest nova ever seen occurred in Aquila in 1918. Other novas were observed in Aquila in 389 and 1899; two were observed there in 1936. Aquila reaches its highest point in the evening sky in late August.
Coordinates:
RA : 19:30
declination : +02

Aquarius Constellation

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Aquarius [Lat.,=water carrier], large constellation located on the ecliptic (the sun's apparent path through the heavens) between Capricornus and Pisces; it is one of the constellations of the zodiac. Aquarius is sometimes represented as a man pouring water from a jar. Although it contains no stars of first or second magnitude, it does contain a recurrent nova observed in 1907 and again in 1962. Aquarius reaches its highest point in the evening sky in October.
Coordinates:
RA : 22:20
Declination: -13

Andromeda Constellation

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Explanation: Andromeda, in astronomy, northern constellation located to the NE of Pegasus and to the S of Cassiopeia. Its brightest star, Alpheratz (Alpha Andromedae), marks the northeast corner of the Great Square in Pegasus. The constellation also contains the bright stars Mirach (Beta Andromedae) and Almach (Gamma Andromedae) and the famous Great Nebula, or Andromeda Galaxy, the only galaxy visible to the naked eye in the Northern Hemisphere. Andromeda reaches its highest point in the evening sky in November.
Coordinates:
RA :00:40
Declination:+38
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